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The Ankara Print (Origin Of Wax Print)

Ankara print fabric

The Ankara print is omnipresent and common material among the fabric from Africa, especially West Africa.

Traditionally, African clothes were worn for special occasions such as family reunions, weddings, and events.

African fabrics and prints are worn with pleasure and it is every woman’s pride to be wearing an African print at an occasion.

These fabrics would not be worn for any particular significance or importance. African fabric forms part of cultural identity and an emblem of cultural heritage.

What Is Ankara?

It is a 100% cotton fabric with vibrant patterns. It is usually a colorful cloth and is primarily associated with Africa because of its tribal-like patterns and motifs.

Ankara print has proven to be versatile and to an extent is now recognized and used globally.

Ankara print

It has suddenly become a must-have in the wardrobes of many people, irrespective of their origin or culture.

And also guys, did you know the Kitenge fabric? You may be asking if there is a difference between Ankara and Kitenge.

There is no difference between the two fabrics. Most of us have the Kitenge and are not even aware of what fabric we have. Wax print get names oo, lol…

But where exactly did Ankara was originated from? That has been most people question, and you will be glad to get the fact from us.

The Origins Of African Ankara Print

But when we refer to this fabric as “African,” we’re missing a much larger story, it has where it was originated from.

Ankara is an African print, popularly known as Ankara in Nigeria. The print gained its popularity globally in 2010 but it has been in existence for many years.

Ankara was originally manufactured by the Dutch for the Indonesian textile market, however, the prints gained significantly more interest in West African countries because of the tribal-like patterns.

How To Care For Your Africa Wax Prints

Now that you’ve rocked your vibrant African print garment and received so many compliments, you’re wondering “how do I properly wash and care for the fabric?

While it may seem challenging, there are certain steps you can take to ensure your garments remain in the same fabulous condition in which you first received them.

Here are some general tips you can follow!

  • Separate colors from whites. If you would like to mix your African fabrics with others, test the colorfastness of the fabrics.
  • The safest and best way to clean your Ankara print fabrics is to hand wash them in cold or lukewarm water.
    If you have to use a washing machine, wash in cold water on the gentle cycle, and skip the spin cycle.
  • Hang the garments to dry or lay them down. Wringing or twisting them to dry will only compromise the rich colors of the fabric and cause them to fade quickly.
  • Since most African print fabrics are made of cotton, the setting for cotton on your iron is appropriate.
    However, look out for attachments made of linen and other more delicate fabrics that may require a lower setting.

The Ankara Print (Summary)

You’ve got to know more than before about the Ankara wax print, the Ankara fabric can never be left behind in the fashion world.

Ankara print colors are amazing, it brings out more than beauty. Also, the fabric is not too expensive.

Normally, the fabrics are sold in lengths of 12 yards (11m) as “full piece” or 6 yards (5.5 m) as “half piece”.

It now a must-have fabric globally. You can get one and make it styled by your fashion designer. Typically, clothing for celebrations is made from this fabric.

Got any questions or want to say something about this? Let us know in the comment section. And don’t forget to like and share it with friends.

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Welcome to my website! My name is Juliana - a seasoned fashion designer. I can help you turn your fabrics into creative native styles of any pedigree. Also, on my blog, you'll find latest top notch native attire styles for ladies and men. Crafting has always been a big part of my life since I was a child and I want to put that into use for you..

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